MYTH: BUSTED! – Review of Matt Fradd’s ‘Porn Myth’

In Featured, Media and Culture, Uncategorized by John LaCrosse

— By Carly Twehous —

If you’ve ever ventured into the strange, pocket-universe of a Catholic university campus, you’ve heard the stats. If you’re here for an extended stay, I’d bet that you’ve heard the speakers and the personal accounts. I can almost guarantee, that at some point, you’ve seen one of your classmates on his skateboard, wearing the patented, red-and-white “Porn Kills Love” T-Shirt.

If you’re like me, you’ve memorized and recited the statistics for conversational shock value and you’ve applauded loudly after each and every inspirational horror story on the dangers of pornography. You’ve probably nearly broken your wrist, attempting to high-five your fellow Fight the New Drug supporter as he rolled by on his way to class.

These things flourish in worlds like mine; the conversations are open and honest and the conclusions are always agreed upon in advance. By no means is this pocket-universe wrong or overly-sheltered; it’s just… safe.

Take a stroll down Hollywood Blvd, and you’ll get a completely different story. Your statistics suddenly become arbitrary because of the crucifix around your neck, the personal stories you’ve heard mean absolutely nothing in the face of the generally accepted principle of relativism, and the “Porn Kills Love” T-shirt becomes a neon target, when thousands of hours of pornography are being filmed just down the block.

Clearly, there’s a chasm between these two worlds, and one of these days, someone’s gonna pop the bubble surrounding this little pocket-universe. Your once-strong beliefs and convictions about pornography are thrown into question and that relativistic mind-set is more and more appealing.

There’s a bone-chilling warning, from Simon and Garfunkel’s song, “Sound of Silence”, that says, “The words of the prophets are written on the subway walls and tenement halls.” In layman’s terms, the words of the prophets, so to speak, must be written in a place where everyone can see them, in a manner that everyone can understand. The idea is, that in order to impact culture, you actually have to be part of the culture. Language, terms, and accepted beliefs all must be held in common for there to be any sort of in-depth discussion on pornography.

(Let’s be honest here: when was the last time you won an argument about the dangers of porn by citing Paragraph 2354 of the Catechism of the Catholic Church?)

That is Matt Fradd’s cue to step up to bat.

The Porn Myth offers unique, conclusive, and thorough scientific and philosophical evidence for the negative consequences of pornography. In it, he details alarming facts and personal accounts from within the porn industry, without judgment or condemnation. Fradd spends entire chapters articulating and explaining pornography’s effects on the brain in easy, colloquial terms, for those of us who failed their Chemistry final in high school.

This book is not a child-proof, hand-holding discussion of the porn industry; it’s a bleak and honest outlook on the exploitation of women, the perversion of sex in our society, and a complete and utter normalization of things that should never be discussed in polite conversation.

Again, let’s be honest: with a subject like this, it’s as easy as drawing a breath to start spewing words of condemnation and damnation, but Matt Fradd takes a refreshingly different approach. While still justly denouncing the industry itself, especially its treatment of women, Fradd offers remarkable compassion and empathy for those trapped in the snares of pornography.

When it comes down to it, porn is not a Catholic problem, meant only to be discussed in safe bubble-universes of shared opinions and assent. Nor is it a Christian problem, answered with an upturned nose and some varied use of the words, “fire and brimstone”. Porn is not exclusive to men, women, race, religion, or Coke/Pepsi preference.

Pornography is a human problem and must be addressed, first and foremost, as such.

We must obliterate the idea that pornography is even remotely redeemable. This book… Well, it’s a proud and justified declaration of war against the entire porn industry.

My advice? Read this book in coffee shops and on the beach, on the bus and in your place of business. Talk about it in the break room and on dates. Plaster this message everywhere you can, and believe me, people will start talking.

This world can no longer stand for silence when it comes to pornography. In a world that worships science and logic and neon gods, The Porn Myth paints the truth, loud and clear, on every available service.

It is, at the very least, one giant leap in the right direction.

Click here to purchase a copy of The Porn Myth by Matt Fradd

About Matt Fradd
Matt Fradd is the founder and executive director of The Porn Effect, a website dedicated to exposing the reality behind the fantasy of porn and offering help. He speaks to about 50,000 people every year on the harmful effects of pornography and how to free from it. He is the author of several books, including Delivered: True Stories of Men and Women Who Turned From Porn to Purity.